The Semantic Structure of Written Communication

Statement of Responsibility:
Beekman, John, John C. Callow, and Michael F. Kopesec
Edition:
fifth revision
Date:
1981
Publisher:
Summer Institute of Linguistics
Publisher Place:
Dallas
Extent:
147 pages
Publication Status:
Published
Table of Contents:

Preface

Part I: Overview of the Theory

  • Chapter 1: Some Basic Notions about Language
    • 1.1 There is a Fundamental Distinction Between Form and Meaning in Language
    • 1.2 The Primary Dimensions of Form
    • 1.3 The Primary Dimensions of Meaning
    • 1.4 The Meaning Determines the Form
    • 1.5 Meaning is Structured

  • Chapter 2: Characteristics of Semantic Structure
    • 2.1 Semantic Structure Consists of Units
    • 2.2 Semantic Structure is Hierarchically Organized
    • 2.3 Each Semantic Unit has the Same Meaning Features
    • 2.4 The Particle, Wave, and Field Perspective

  • Chapter 3: The Relationship of Semantic Structure to Surface Structure
    • 3.1 The Three Analytical Features are Universals
    • 3.2 There are Three Hierarchies in Language
    • 3.3 The Semantic Hierarchy is the “Master” Hierarchy
    • 3.4 Skewing Between the Semantic and Grammatical Hierarchies
  • Part II: A Detailed Presentation of the Theory of Semantic and Structure

  • Chapter 4: The Major Discourse Types
    • 4.0 Introduction
    • 4.1 Conversation and Discourse Genre
    • 4.2 The Major Discourse Types Defined
    • 4.3 Parameters of the Major Discourse Types
    • 4.4 Discourse Types and the Author’s Purpose
    • 4.5 Discourse Types and Specific Genres

  • Chapter 5: The Concept
    • 5.0 Introduction
    • 5.1 Lexical Versus Discourse Concepts
    • 5.2 The Concept View Analytically
    • 5.3 The Concept View Holistically
    • 5.4 The Concept and Surface Structure
    • 5.5 Summary

  • Chapter 6: The Proposition
    • 6.1 Referential Meaning and the Proposition
    • 6.2 Situational Meaning and the Proposition
    • 6.3 Structural Meaning and the Proposition
    • 6.4 Prominence and the Three Aspects of Meaning in the Proposition
    • 6.5 The Proposition and Surface Structure
    • 6.6 Representing the Proposition in a Semantic Structure Analysis
    • 6.7 Summary

  • Chapter 7: The Propositional Cluster
    • 7.1 The Propositional Cluster as a Propositional Configuration
    • 7.2 Simple, Complex, and Compound Propositional Clusters
    • 7.3 Coherence in the Propositional Cluster
    • 7.4 Classification of the Proposition Cluster
    • 7.5 The Role and Purpose of the Propositional Cluster
    • 7.6 Prominence in the Propositional Cluster
    • 7.7 The Propositional Cluster and Surface Structure
    • 7.8 Summary

  • Chapter 8: The Communication Relations and Roles
    • 8.1 Relations and Roles Distinguished
    • 8.2 Communication Relations and Discourse Genre
    • 8.3 Generic Classification of Relations
    • 8.4 The Chronological Addition Relations
    • 8.5 The Non-chronological Addition Relations
    • 8.6 The Chronological Support Relations: Progression
    • 8.7 The Chronological Support Relations: Stimulus-Response
    • 8.8 The Non-chronological Support Relations: Orientation
    • 8.9 The Non-chronological Support Relations: Clarification
    • 8.10 The Non-chronological Support Relations: Logical
    • 8.11 The Non-chronological Support Relations: Association
    • 8.12 Relations Between Communication
    • 8.13 Prominence and the Communication Relations

  • Chapter 9: The Paragraph and Larger Units in Non-narrative Genres
    • 9.1 Coherence in the Paragraph
    • 9.2 Paragraph Boundaries and Koine Greek Surface Structure
    • 9.3 The Classification of the Information
    • 9.4 The Role of Paragraphs
    • 9.5 Prominence and Thematic Content in the Paragraph
    • 9.6 Simple, Complex, and Compound Paragraphs
    • 9.7 The Theme of Compound Paragraphs
    • 9.8 Paragraph Clusters
    • 9.9 The Purpose of the Paragraph
    • 9.10 Summary
    • 9.11 Units Larger than the Paragraph in Non-narrative Genres

  • Chapter 10: Narrative Units and their Characteristics
    • 10.1 The Hierarchy of Narrative Units
    • 10.2 Coherence Features in Narration
    • 10.3 Prominence in Narrative
    • 10.4 The Purpose of Narrative Units
    • 10.5 The Time-Line

Bibliography

Content Language:
Field:
Work Type:
Subject:
Discourse analysis
Semantics
Nature of Work:
Entry Number:
1501