Passive possession in Oceanic

Authors:
Date:
2008
Sponsored By:
UK Arts and Humanities Research Council
Part Of Series:
Studies in Philippine Languages and Cultures; 10-ICAL Austronesian Papers; Volume 18 (2008); pp. 119-141
Extent:
pages 119-141
Abstract:
This paper reviews the notion of passive possession in Oceanic, a phenomenon in which possessors that are acted on by the possessum, or at least have no control over it, are marked distinctively using either direct marking, which is used prototypically to mark inalienability, or an indirect marker used prototypically to mark items intended for consumption. The paper surveys seven Oceanic languages from diverse subgroups and reappraises Lynch's (2001) proposals regarding passive possession. It concludes that contrary to previous investigations, subject matter possessors, possessors that are acted upon, and possessors of nominalised verbs are typically treated differently in Oceanic grammars; that the standard exemplar language Standard Fijian is actually highly atypical; and that true passive possession is unlikely to have been directly possessor-indexed in Proto-Oceanic.
Publication Status:
Published
Country:
Fiji
Papua New Guinea
Solomon Islands
Content Language:
Field:
Work Type:
Nature of Work:
Entry Number:
42073