The legacy of academic stories in applied linguistics

Date:
2012
Date Created:
2010
Part Of Series:
GIALens: Electronic Notes Series 6(1)
Extent:
16 pages
Abstract:
The Graduate Institute of Linguistics (GIAL, www.gial.edu) grew out of a proprietary school run by SIL International (www.sil.org) and supports the linguistic and translation goals of that organization, the Wycliffe Bible Translators (www.wycliffe.net), and other like-minded agencies. It follows the legacies of men like Professor Kenneth L. Pike (1912-2000) and Wycliffe cofounder William Cameron Townsend (1896-1982), by offering programs in applied linguistics and language development. Both Pike and Townsend were skilled storytellers and mentors. I discuss their contributions to the topic of orality, including stories that form and inform parts of the GIAL and SIL corporate cultures. Because storytelling has a long academic tradition in seminaries (e.g., studying the parables), in elementary and in secondary education, and in the college humanities, I describe some of the ways that SIL and GIAL have continued this tradition. Storytelling is also germane in cultural studies (oral histories) in developing-world universities, and is also a vehicle that literacy efforts promote for minority languages. Finally, story (or narrative) is the dominant theme and style of the Bible and its translation, a primary concern of GIAL and SIL. With such efforts and history in mind, this article concludes by outlining how features of story-telling are incorporated into the curricula of GIAL and thereby contribute to the legacy of SIL academic storytelling.
Publication Status:
Published
Content Language:
Work Type:
Subject:
WBT
Storytelling
SIL
Pike
GIAL
Nature of Work:
Entry Number:
48761