Case Grammar Applied

Statement of Responsibility:
Cook, Walter A
Authors:
Series Issue:
127
Date:
1998
Publisher:
Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington
Publisher Place:
Dallas
Part Of Series:
Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington Publications in Linguistics 127
Extent:
xiii, 271 pages
Publication Status:
Published
Table of Contents:

Preface

  1. Case Grammar Theory
  2. 1.1-1.3 Case Grammar goals
    1.1. Case structure
    1.2. Case lexicon
    1.3. Case systems

    1.4-1.6 Logical structure
    1.4. The proposition
    1.5. Predicate
    1.6. Argument

    1.7-1.9 Case roles
    1.7. The nature of case roles
    1.8. Case inventory
    1.9. Subject choice hierarchy

    1.10-1.12 Case frames
    1.10. Preliminaries to case assignment
    1.11. Case tactics
    1.12. The revised Case Grammar matrix

    1.13-1.15 Derivation
    1.13. Existence of related predicates
    1.14. Bidirectional derivation
    1.15. Lexical decomposition

    1.16-1.19 Covert case roles
    1.16. Deletable roles
    1.17. Coreferential roles
    1.18. Lexicalized roles
    1.19. Where is the Theme?

    1.20-1.22 Methodology
    1.20. Text analysis procedures
    1.21. Conceptual graphs
    1.22. Case Grammar and conceptual graphs

    1.23. Conclusion

  3. The Basic Domain
  4. 2.1-2.2 Basic State verbs
    2.1. State with single Os
    2.2. State with double Os

    2.3-2.4 Basic Process verbs
    2.3. Process with single O
    2.4. Process with double O

    2.5-2.9 Basic Action verbs
    2.5. Action with A=O coreference
    2.6. Action with O-lexicalized
    2.7. Action with both roles overt
    2.8. Action with double O
    2.9. Action with double Agent

  5. The Experiential Domain
  6. 3.1-3.3 State Experiential verbs
    3.1. Experiential state with E-subject
    3.2. Experiential state with Os subject
    3.3. Experiential state with double Os

    3.4-3.5 Process Experiential verbs
    3.4. Experiential process with E-subject
    3.5. Experiential process with O-subject

    3.6-3.9 Action Experiential verbs
    3.6. With A=E coreference
    3.7. With A=O coreference
    3.8. With O-lexicalized
    3.9. With all roles overt

  7. The Benefactive Domain
  8. 4.1-4.2 State Benefactive verbs
    4.1. State with B-subject
    4.2. State with Os subject

    4.3-4.4 Process Benefactive verbs
    4.3. Process with B-subject
    4.4. Process with 0 subject

    4.5-4.7 Action Benefactive verbs
    4.5. Action with A=B coreference
    4.6. Action with O-lexicalized
    4.7. Action with all roles overt

  9. The Locative Domain
  10. 5.1-5.2 State Locative verbs
    5.1. With O-subject (Os,L)
    5.2. State with L-subject (L,Os)

    5.3-5.4 Process Locative verbs
    5.3. Process with O-subject (O,L)
    5.4. With L-subject (L,O)

    5.5-5.10 Action Locative verbs
    5.5. Action with A=O coreference (A,*O,L /A=O)
    5.6. Action with A=L coreference (A=L,O)
    5.7. Action with O-lexicalized (A,*O,L)
    5.8. Action with L-lexicalized (A,O,*L /L-lex)
    5.9. Action with all roles overt (A,O,L)
    5.10. Double Agent verbs

  11. The Modality
  12. 6.1. Auxiliaries as main verbs
    6.2. Neutralization of the perfect

    6.3-6.5 Tense and aspect
    6.3. Nonprogressive tenses (States and events)
    6.4. Progressive tenses (Events only)
    6.5. Habitual tenses (Events only)

    6.6-6.11 Modal verbs
    6.6. Epistemic modals
    6.7. Root modals
    6.8. Ability modal
    6.9. Epistemic modals with tense
    6.10. Root modals with tense
    6.11. Ability modal with tense

    6.12-6.13 Negation
    6.12. Negation of propositions
    6.13. Negation with modals

    6.14-6.19 Logical structure
    6.14. Performative layet
    6.15. Tense-Aspect-Modal layer
    6.16. Propositional layer
    6.17. Noun phrase modification
    6.18. Parsing with Case Grammar
    6.19. Knowledge representation

  13. Verb Ontology
  14. 7.1-7.3 The Basic domain
    7.1. Class 1: Basic State
    7.2. Class 2: Basic Process
    7.3. Class 3: Basic Action

    7.4-7.6 The Experiential domain
    7.4. Class 4: State Experiential
    7.5 Class 5: Process Experiential
    7.6. Class 6: Action Experiential

    7.7-7.9 The Benefactive domain
    7.7. Class 7: State Benefactive
    7.8. Class 8: Process Benefactive
    7.9. Class 9: Action Benefactive

    7.10-7.12 The Locative domain
    7.10. Class 10: State Locative
    7.11 Class 11: Process Locatives
    7.12 Class 12: Action Locative

    7.13. Conclusion

Alphabetical Lexicon
Case Lexicon
References
Index

Content Language:
Field:
Work Type:
Subject:
Case Grammar
Nature of Work:
Entry Number:
8430