The French Imparfait and Passé Simple in Discourse

Statement of Responsibility:
Rand, Sharon R
Authors:
Series Issue:
116
Date:
1993
Publisher:
Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington
Publisher Place:
Dallas
Part Of Series:
Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington Publications in Linguistics 116
Extent:
xi, 136 pages
Publication Status:
Published
Table of Contents:

List of Abbreviations
Acknowledgments

  1. The Imparfait and the Passé Simple: Different Approaches
  2. 1.1-1.6 Grammatical approaches
    1.1 Grammaire Larousse
    1.2 Grévisse
    1.3 Imbs
    1.4 Abrate
    1.5 Cox
    1.6 Comrie

    1.7-1.8 Discourse approaches
    1.7 Strong focus versus weak focus
    1.8 Foregrounding versus backgrounding

  3. Boundedness and Nonboundedness
  4. 2.1 A core semantic value for the imparfait
    2.2 Boundedness and nonboundedness as core traits
    2.3 Boundedness and Grobe’s restricted/nonrestricted opposition
    2.4 A definition of boundedness
    2.5 Boundedness and Abrate’s emphasis model
    2.6 Boundedness and discourse approaches

  5. Event and State Concepts
  6. 3.1 Definitions
    3.2 Points of reference: Objective and subjective

    3.3-3.5 Levels of abstraction
    3.3 Level one: Phenomena
    3.4 Level two: Perception
    3.5 Level three: Communication
    3.6 Event and state as metaphor

  7. Event and State in Relation to Verb Types?
  8. 4.1 Vendler’s four verb types
    4.2 Kenny’s three verb types
    4.3 Garey: Telic versus atelic verb types
    4.4 Comrie’s situation types
    4.5 Mourelatos’ situation categories
    4.6 Mourelatos’ aspectual distinctions applied to French

  9. Event and State in Different Uses of the Imparfait and Passe Simple
  10. 5.1 Categories of examples

    5.2-5.11 Imparfait: Uses
    5.2 Circumstance or description
    5.3 Imparfait-passé simple: Classical opposition
    5.4 Duration
    5.5 Background
    5.6 Commentary
    5.7 Perspective or indirect style
    5.8 Picturesque, historical, or narrative
    5.9 Closing or opening
    5.10 Habitual
    5.11 Progression

    5.12-5.13 Passé simple: Uses
    5.12 Nonstative verbs
    5.13 Stative verbs

  11. Event and State in a French Narrative Text
  12. 6.1-6.8 Surface structure of “L’huissier”
    6.1 Initial chunking of “L’huissier”
    6.2 Episode 1
    6.3 Episode 3
    6.4 Breakdown of episode 2
    6.5 Episode 2a
    6.6 Episode 2b1
    6.7 Episode 2b2
    6.8 Surface structure findings

    6.9-6.11 Notional structure of “L’huissier”
    6.9 Tension level and peak markings
    6.10 Stage or setting and climactic sections
    6.11 Summary of notional structure
    6.12 Summary
    6.13 Conclusions

Appendix
References

Country:
France
Subject Languages:
Content Language:
Field:
Work Type:
Subject:
Tense/Aspect
Nature of Work:
Entry Number:
8785