Case Grammar Applied

Author(s):
Cook, Walter A
Description:

Case Grammar has been around for a long time. Other theories have come and gone. Why a book on Case Grammar now?

Dr. Walter Cook, S.J., is one of the promoters of the Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics and author of numerous publications in linguistics. In Case Grammar Theory (1989), the author described the Case Grammar models of Fillmore, Chafe, Anderson, Gruber, Jackendoff, and some tagmemicists as contrasting models within Case Grammar theory. In the present volume, intended as a companion volume to the previous one, we find a methodology for Case Grammar, tested in extended textual analysis including Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea.

Because Case Grammar lends itself well to displaying the way syntactic features are associated with semantic structures, the author is able to use Case Grammar as an unusually clear, simple guide for sentence analysis.

Table of Contents:

Preface

  1. Case Grammar Theory
  2. 1.1-1.3 Case Grammar goals
    1.1. Case structure
    1.2. Case lexicon
    1.3. Case systems

    1.4-1.6 Logical structure
    1.4. The proposition
    1.5. Predicate
    1.6. Argument

    1.7-1.9 Case roles
    1.7. The nature of case roles
    1.8. Case inventory
    1.9. Subject choice hierarchy

    1.10-1.12 Case frames
    1.10. Preliminaries to case assignment
    1.11. Case tactics
    1.12. The revised Case Grammar matrix

    1.13-1.15 Derivation
    1.13. Existence of related predicates
    1.14. Bidirectional derivation
    1.15. Lexical decomposition

    1.16-1.19 Covert case roles
    1.16. Deletable roles
    1.17. Coreferential roles
    1.18. Lexicalized roles
    1.19. Where is the Theme?

    1.20-1.22 Methodology
    1.20. Text analysis procedures
    1.21. Conceptual graphs
    1.22. Case Grammar and conceptual graphs

    1.23. Conclusion

  3. The Basic Domain
  4. 2.1-2.2 Basic State verbs
    2.1. State with single Os
    2.2. State with double Os

    2.3-2.4 Basic Process verbs
    2.3. Process with single O
    2.4. Process with double O

    2.5-2.9 Basic Action verbs
    2.5. Action with A=O coreference
    2.6. Action with O-lexicalized
    2.7. Action with both roles overt
    2.8. Action with double O
    2.9. Action with double Agent

  5. The Experiential Domain
  6. 3.1-3.3 State Experiential verbs
    3.1. Experiential state with E-subject
    3.2. Experiential state with Os subject
    3.3. Experiential state with double Os

    3.4-3.5 Process Experiential verbs
    3.4. Experiential process with E-subject
    3.5. Experiential process with O-subject

    3.6-3.9 Action Experiential verbs
    3.6. With A=E coreference
    3.7. With A=O coreference
    3.8. With O-lexicalized
    3.9. With all roles overt

  7. The Benefactive Domain
  8. 4.1-4.2 State Benefactive verbs
    4.1. State with B-subject
    4.2. State with Os subject

    4.3-4.4 Process Benefactive verbs
    4.3. Process with B-subject
    4.4. Process with 0 subject

    4.5-4.7 Action Benefactive verbs
    4.5. Action with A=B coreference
    4.6. Action with O-lexicalized
    4.7. Action with all roles overt

  9. The Locative Domain
  10. 5.1-5.2 State Locative verbs
    5.1. With O-subject (Os,L)
    5.2. State with L-subject (L,Os)

    5.3-5.4 Process Locative verbs
    5.3. Process with O-subject (O,L)
    5.4. With L-subject (L,O)

    5.5-5.10 Action Locative verbs
    5.5. Action with A=O coreference (A,*O,L /A=O)
    5.6. Action with A=L coreference (A=L,O)
    5.7. Action with O-lexicalized (A,*O,L)
    5.8. Action with L-lexicalized (A,O,*L /L-lex)
    5.9. Action with all roles overt (A,O,L)
    5.10. Double Agent verbs

  11. The Modality
  12. 6.1. Auxiliaries as main verbs
    6.2. Neutralization of the perfect

    6.3-6.5 Tense and aspect
    6.3. Nonprogressive tenses (States and events)
    6.4. Progressive tenses (Events only)
    6.5. Habitual tenses (Events only)

    6.6-6.11 Modal verbs
    6.6. Epistemic modals
    6.7. Root modals
    6.8. Ability modal
    6.9. Epistemic modals with tense
    6.10. Root modals with tense
    6.11. Ability modal with tense

    6.12-6.13 Negation
    6.12. Negation of propositions
    6.13. Negation with modals

    6.14-6.19 Logical structure
    6.14. Performative layet
    6.15. Tense-Aspect-Modal layer
    6.16. Propositional layer
    6.17. Noun phrase modification
    6.18. Parsing with Case Grammar
    6.19. Knowledge representation

  13. Verb Ontology
  14. 7.1-7.3 The Basic domain
    7.1. Class 1: Basic State
    7.2. Class 2: Basic Process
    7.3. Class 3: Basic Action

    7.4-7.6 The Experiential domain
    7.4. Class 4: State Experiential
    7.5 Class 5: Process Experiential
    7.6. Class 6: Action Experiential

    7.7-7.9 The Benefactive domain
    7.7. Class 7: State Benefactive
    7.8. Class 8: Process Benefactive
    7.9. Class 9: Action Benefactive

    7.10-7.12 The Locative domain
    7.10. Class 10: State Locative
    7.11 Class 11: Process Locatives
    7.12 Class 12: Action Locative

    7.13. Conclusion

Alphabetical Lexicon
Case Lexicon
References
Index

Retail Price:
$30.50
Date:
1998
Extent:
xiii, 271 pages
Subject:
Case Grammar
ISBN 13:
978-1556710469
ISBN 10:
1556710461
Size:
6 × 9 × 0.6 in
Weight:
0.9 lb
Field:
Content Language: