Journal of Translation

The Journal of Translation is an academic journal of translation theory and practice with a special interest in Bible translation and in translation involving minority languages and cultures. Its purpose is to encourage scholarship, to enlighten the reader, to stimulate thought and discussion, and to promote appropriate cross-cultural and cross-linguistic communication.

Editor’s Comments by David Frank This issue of the Journal of Translation begins with an article on translation theory in the twentieth century by Andy Cheung of King’s Evangelical Divinity School in the U.K. With a focus on Bible translation, Cheung examines philosophical and theoretical influences ranging from the philosophical traditions of the early to mid-twentieth century (Pound, Benjamin, Buber and Rosenzweig), through the linguistic era in the early part of the second half of the twentieth century (Jakobson, Levy, Nida, Catford), to contemporary translation orientations that...
This article studies the development of twentieth century translation theory. This was a period during which significant theoretical contributions were made in both secular and Bible translation circles. These contributions have had a profound impact on the practice of translation throughout the twentieth century and since. The individuals who contributed to the present state of translation theory worked in both secular and Bible translation circles and this article examines contributions from both. A select history of theoretical developments, focusing on the most important ideas relevant to...
In the last decade or so, the United Bible Societies have paid increasing attention to orality, features of orality in biblical texts, and what impact these should have on Bible translation. Articles appeared in The Bible Translator, an Orality Working Group was convened in 2008, a Source Text and Orality Workshop for Europe-Middle East translation consultants took place in January 2011, and an Intersemiotic Translation workshop was held in March 2011. Some of these findings have led the author to reflect on performance criticism in this contribution.
The oral qualities of the Hebrew Bible diminished over time as it was written down and codified. This paper examines one book of the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Esther, and how translations shape its use. This book is particularly interesting to the storyteller because the Book of Esther is still recited as a story as part of the Jewish festival of Purim. Since the requirements of the festival include the recitation of this story, the book’s translation influences the celebration significantly. The ultimate point of this paper is to highlight the importance of the storyteller in the translation...