Sociopolitics

It has been said that "all orthographies are political," and this expresses much truth. An orthography is a mark of people's identity. It shows how they connect to other groups, or refuse to connect with them. Sociopolitical factors make a huge difference in whether an orthography is acceptable or not.

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