Journal of Translation

The Journal of Translation is an academic journal of translation theory and practice with a special interest in Bible translation and in translation involving minority languages and cultures. Its purpose is to encourage scholarship, to enlighten the reader, to stimulate thought and discussion, and to promote appropriate cross-cultural and cross-linguistic communication.

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Journal of Translation 14(1) (2018)

We are pleased to present in this issue of the Journal of Translation two related articles pertaining to the translation of the Hebrew Scriptures, also known as the Old Testament. The article “Toward a Best Practice…” by Peter Schmidt addresses the handling of the authors’ explanatory notes in translation in relation to the notes added by the translator or an editor of the translation, proposing a systematic way of indicating and distinguishing between the two kinds of notes. The article by Gerhard Tauberschmidt explores the distinction between “Polysemy and Homonymy in Biblical Hebrew...
This article will help translation teams to develop a best practice for dealing with explanatory notes that are made by the Biblical authors themselves. To my knowledge there is no standard resource for Bible translators that addresses in some detail the issue of explanatory (or: parenthetical) notes. However, every Bible translator will face numerous such notes and has to decide what to do with them. Some standard versions appear unsystematic in this and are of limited help. This article discusses what options a translator has in dealing with such notes. Special attention is given to...
In the analysis of Hebrew lexical items there is sometimes a tendency to interpret words exclusively based on their root meaning. In fact, the one-sided etymological analysis of Hebrew words is particularly tempting, because most Hebrew words are constructed around lexical roots consisting of two or three (sometimes four) consonants that are shared in common by a family of related words. Deriving the meaning of a lexical item exclusively from its root meaning while disregarding the phenomenon of semantic shift, which is frequently caused by metonymy, can lead to incorrect interpretations....
The Bible in India has been seen by some as an offshoot of the missionary movement in pre- and post-independence times. Such allegations belie a technical or stylistic reading of the translated scriptures into Hindi, which is the great unread aspect of the Bible. The Bible translated into Hindi is titled Dharmasastra. The present study aims to compare the Hindi version with another translation in a completely different part of the world, the Chichewa Bible. Chichewa is a Bantu language widely spoken in SE Africa. It turns out that the Hindi translation of the Bible is surprisingly...